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March 2, 2011
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Plateosaurus engelhardti by Iphicrates Plateosaurus engelhardti by Iphicrates
Plateosaurus engelhardti being chased by predators.

The big dinosaurian predator/prey relationships of the late Triassic are still not fully understood. We know of big dinosaurian predators from the late Triassic with twenty foot long Gojirasaurus and seventeen foot long Liliensternus from the southwestern United States and Germany respectively, yet we don't know how common they were in the big predator guilds of the time, or how widespread such large (by today's standards) predators were in their world. Only time, and more discoveries, will tell.

Also, as a ranting aside to paleoart purveyors, I have to say that I am sick to death of the trend among paleoartists painting animals and then putting them in real-life photographic images; I find it a crass method at putting some sort of reality into the image when in the end it doesn't look anymore real than if you'd painted the entire image from scratch; it just shows you exactly what it is: a real life image with a synthetic dinosaur plopped in--bad taste and form in my opinion. I haven't seen one image done in that fashion that I thought was genuinely worth while and I will never create a piece in such a way no matter how strapped for time I am.

Oh, by the way, those out of focus things in the background are early pterosaurs--thought you should know...
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:iconheytomemeimhome:
Nice picture, but it's inaccurate because plateosaurus was an obligate biped and was unable to pronate it's wrists.
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:iconiphicrates:
Iphicrates Sep 14, 2011   General Artist
Thanks! I can't wait to go back to the Triassic!
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:iconsauroposeidon:
Sauroposeidon Sep 14, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Nice! :rose:
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:iconiphicrates:
Iphicrates Sep 14, 2011   General Artist
Thanks! I can't wait to go back to the Triassic!
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:iconcorvo9:
Nice work. I also agree with using real photos as a background for reconstructions.
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:iconiphicrates:
Iphicrates Aug 1, 2011   General Artist
Thanks so much! Yeah the rendered backgrounds can at times (as with my Castille-Leon Dinosauria painting) take nearly as long to create as the dinosaurs themselves but I think are, while viewing, on the whole more pleasant and less jarring to the visual cortex than the "copy and paste" paintings so prevalent these days.
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:iconcorvo9:
They are less jarring, and it is easier to ensure that the flora matches the fauna as well. Blurred photos are just starting to look like a short cut, without adding much to the image.
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:iconiphicrates:
Iphicrates Aug 3, 2011   General Artist
True. If only I could get my colleagues to stop using such cheap tricks in paleoart--as a perspective, if I tried to submit a painting of Conan the barbarian shopped in front of a real location to a publisher they would laugh in my face and call it crass drivel but for some reason it's ok in paleoart; I suppose more than anything this illuminates the low artistic standards that are unfortunately inherent in the medium. Maybe time, and more criticism, will change this.
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:iconiphicrates:
Iphicrates Jun 14, 2011   General Artist
Thanks! I was trying with this painting and some others I did in the paleoart medium to explore concepts pertaining to the image's depth of field. Others such as Braginetz and Felder have played with concept but I was wanting to push it further and work with the interactions of the characters within and without focus and how the viewers reacts differently to both. Definitely something I want to continue to explore.
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:iconelephas1:
very cool, clever idea, clear vission
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